Lived oak

With lived oak, the blade’s surface is brushed, which leads to both extra emphasis on the knots as well as highlighting the wood’s character. Knots and cracks are generally left open, furthermore the edges are sawed in. With these kinds of tables, wood really plays the lead.

 

Characterisation lived oak minus

  • No big cracks
  • Knots remain unfilled
  • Maximum size of unfilled knots is 4 cm

Characterisation lived oak 

  • May contain big cracks
  • Maximum size of unfilled knots is 6 cm
  • This blade is more crowded than lived oak minus
  • This blade contains more knots than lived oak minus

The photo on the right displays a lived oak blade. The photo below displays a lived oak minus.

 

All tables are composed of different planks. Because every plank has a different colour, we cannot prevent colour differences between the planks. Wood is a natural product, which is why tops cannot be copied exactly and table tops differ from each other.

 

Filling

You may opt to fill the knots up or leave them open. Filling knots is usually done with an oak-coloured paste that colours along with your table’s colour. There’s also the option to pick a black filling. Even with an ‘unfilled’ blade we may fill some particularly sharp knots to ensure the users’ safety.



Brushing

Lived oak blades are brushed by default, which ensures a lived look. Even if you pick a lived oak blade that is filled, it is normally brushed. Unfortunately, we cannot prevent this, so if you would prefer a sealed table, opt for a non-brushed blade. Additionally, every plank has its own hardness, so one plank may display more structure than the other.

 
 

Sawing in (default)

Square and rectangular blades are sawn in by default. This is a manual process, which is why the result may slightly vary due to the wood’s hardness as well as its natural cracks. You can find a good example of a sawn in tabletop on the two pictures to your right-hand side. 

Not sawing in (optional)

Square and rectangular blades are sawn in by default. This is a manual process, which is why the result may slightly vary due to the wood’s hardness as well as its natural cracks (as shown above).

 
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